Make Healthy Choices This Holiday Season

Make Healthy Choices This Holiday Season

The holidays are fast approaching and although they promise to be a little different this year you will surely be faced with the typical temptations and it might be harder than usual to resist them. 


As the health crisis continues frustrations become more numerous and stress can elevate. There may also be disappointment at not being able to engage in longstanding traditions. I’m here to encourage you to be diligent and don’t get derailed from your healthy lifestyle during the holidays.

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Be Fit and Eat Good Food

Be Fit and Eat Good Food

When initiating lifestyle changes to support your health and well-being don’t feel like you have to do it all by yourself. In fact you’re more likely to be successful if you have the help and support of others. 


Get in the routine of engaging in some type of physical activity 5 days a week. Look at your calendar or planner to see what you’ve already got scheduled. Then block out time for exercise. Write down what you plan to do and when. If you put it on the calendar and intentionally set time aside you’re more likely to actually do it.

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Leading Causes of Death Linked to Nutrition

Leading Causes of Death Linked to Nutrition

Seven out of the ten leading causes of death in the U.S. have a strong link to nutrition. They are heart disease, cancer, lower respiratory disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and kidney disease. The other three are accidents, influenza and suicide. 


Heart disease is the top killer in the U.S. Plaque, caused by fatty deposits that accumulate in the arteries, hardens over the years and eventually limits blood flow. To reduce plaque buildup reduce the amount of trans fats, saturated fats and dietary cholesterol you consume. Trans fats are found in meat, dairy and processed foods. Saturated fat comes from animal sources and is found in junk foods. Cholesterol is found in eggs and animal foods.


The American Medical Association, AMA, has recommended that meat and dairy be presented as optional, rather than required, in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is slated to release new dietary guidelines by the end of this year.


The AMA stated that dairy, processed meat, and red meat consumption have been strongly linked to prostate and colorectal cancers as well as cardiovascular risk, and noted that Black Americans are at particularly high risk for these diseases. The AMA letter states. “Dairy and meat products are promoted in federal nutrition policies even though they are not nutritionally required.”


Adopting a whole foods plant-based diet has been found to prevent or reverse all seven. Why not introduce or expand the healthy foods you eat and eliminate the ones that can make you sick? 


Eat a diet rich in whole grains, beans and legumes, vegetables, fruit, and green leafy vegetables. Avoid oil, fish, fowl, meat, dairy, and sugar.


It’s important that you know the effects the foods you eat can have on your health. YOU have the ability to take control of your health and wellness. It may mean a change in lifestyle but it’s worth it!


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Quick + Healthy Plant-Based Dinners

Quick + Healthy Plant-Based Dinners

Getting a healthy meal on the table can be a struggle especially when you’re in a hurry and didn’t plan ahead. Instead of ordering takeout, stopping at a fast food restaurant or eating cereal for dinner, I challenge you to whip up a quick, nutritious dinner. First, make sure you have your freezer and pantry properly stocked. After that it’ll be easy!


To create a quick salad, start by purchasing pre-washed packages of greens like lettuce blends, slaw, or spinach. Choose toppings like cherry or grape tomatoes, pre-sliced mushrooms, shredded carrots, pre-sliced beets, quartered artichoke hearts, sliced water chestnuts, canned garbanzo or black beans, olives, hummus, avocado or guacamole, nuts, seeds, or etc. 


You can add pretty much anything you want to a base of greens. What you choose to include will determine how filling your salad is so make sure you include protein such as legumes, seeds, or nuts.


Have a supply of frozen vegetable noodles like zucchini, carrots or butternut squash on hand. Top them with pasta sauce or frozen mixed vegetables with low sodium soy sauce and spices. Frozen mixed vegetables can also be used to make a simple stir fry. Serve it over a quick cooking grain like quinoa, a frozen riced vegetable, or fresh spiralized veggies.


Other quick, nutritious meals include grain bowls, burritos, wraps, low or no sodium soup, or pizza made on a frozen cauliflower crust.


The key is to have ingredients on hand so you don’t have to think too much about what to make. Just pull items out of the freezer, refrigerator, and pantry, decide what combination you want, and in about 15 minutes, volé dinner.


7 out of the 10 leading causes of death in the United States are linked to nutrition. Eat for your health today and every day!


If you haven’t picked it up yet, get my guide, 4 “natural” ways to support your immune system. Click hereThe foods you eat may help you avoid or potentially reverse certain diseases.

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